Is my website hacked? If you have to ask then, “Yes.”

The problem with phishing, and therefore the reason so many people have trouble with it, is that the code is fairly benign and can be very difficult to spot because it usually looks almost exactly like legitimate code. Oftentimes, a website owner won’t know their site is hacked with a phishing scam until site visitors inform them, which is why finding phishing pages can feel like searching for a needle in a haystack.

That’s what makes the following story so instructive.

Many thanks to our own Ben Martin for walking us through the scam (and for cleaning the client’s website).

The Problem

Recently, we cleared malware from a client’s website and our malware removal expert, Ben, found some interesting phishing pages.

Where was the injection located?

It’s in the hacker’s best interest to hide their phishing pages and they’re often able to do so because the code is so benign. They don’t need to run malicious scripts or inject iframes. In this case, the page doesn’t contain any suspicious functions or calls to Russian domains. It just consists of text input fields, a.k.a. normal sorts of code you’d see on any website. The key then is to know what you’re looking for and to do that, you have to think like a hacker.

What are phishing scams attempting?

This is where it becomes important to remember what a phishing scam is normally attempting to do. In many cases, they’re looking for bank records like credit card or debit card numbers, so we kept it simple and searched, “bank,” and look what we found:

Bank

See it? The title_netbank.jpg looked suspicious and, interestingly enough, all it took was that one reference in index.htm to the .jpg file to lead us to the phishing pages. We didn’t stop there though. We also dug a little deeper and found an .htaccess file in the directory.

htaccess

What you’re seeing here are IP addresses that are allowed to view the phishing page. In this case, only those with Danish IP addresses are being redirected to view the page. In this way, the hackers are able to to narrow the scope of their attacks to those who are most likely to enter their bank numbers, while not showing a suspicious page to extra people who may alert the bank or our client to the scam.

Here’s what this specific page looked like. It was being used to redirect customers to something that looked like a Nordea Bank AB user page (Nordea Bank is a financial group operating in Northern Europe). Even if you’ve never heard of Nordea, potential customers based in Northern Europe would have heard of the bank and would have been put at risk.

Nordea

What did we learn?

The hack we cleaned here isn’t extravagant. It wasn’t obfuscated behind layers and layers of code. In fact, it was relatively simple, which is instructive. Malicious code can affect your website even when its relatively easy to spot. The lesson as always is, if you have a feeling that your site has been compromised, then it probably has been.

Understanding Google’s Blacklist – Cleaning Your Hacked Website and Removing From Blacklist

Today we found an interesting case where Google was blacklisting a client’s site but not sharing the reason why. The fact they were sharing very little info should not be new, but what we found as we dove a little deeper should be. The idea is to provide you webmasters with the required insight to understand what is going on, and how to troubleshoot things when your website is blacklisted.

Get Your Bearing

While investigating the website, we found that some Google shortened URLs were being loaded and redirecting to http://bls.pw/. Two of the goo.gl links were pointing to Wikipedia images, their icon to be specific, and one was redirecting to http://bls.pw/ shortener.

goo.gl/9yBTe - http://bits.wikimedia.org/favicon/wikipedia.ico
goo.gl/hNVXP - http://bits.wikimedia.org/favicon/wikipedia.ico?2x2
goo.gl/24vi1 - http://bls.pw/

A quick search for this last URL took us to /wp-content/themes/Site’sTheme/css/iefix.sct. As malware writers like to do, it was trying to trick us into believing it was good code. In this case, the Sizzle CSS Selector Engine code (Real code here) was the target:

Sucuri  Sizzle CSS Selector Engine Modified III

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Dealing with WordPress Malware

A few months back I contributed to a post with Smashing Magazine on the top 4 WordPress Infections, it was released yesterday, and it couldn’t have been at a better time. If any one attended WordCamp Las Vegas you might even find some similarities. Fortunately in the process of preparing for the event and working with the team, we were able to compile a bit more information expanding on the things we originally discussed in the last post. It’s perfect timing for a number of reasons, and will complement this post very nicely.

WordPress Malware
The idea of this post, like many in the past, is to outline and discuss this past weekend’s presentation. In the process, hopefully you take something away. Unfortunately, the presentation was capped off with a live attack and hack, and I won’t be able to include that in this post, but I promise it’s coming.

**Note: If you plan to be at WordCamp Philadelphia 2012 you might be in for some treats, just saying. And if you don’t have it on the calendar, you should.

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Fake jQuery Website Serving Redirection Malware

This just in, hot off the press, careful with the jQuery libraries you’re using on your websites.

We received word from @chris_olbekson via Twitter about some hacks being reported on the WordPress forums:

chris_olbekson

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Conditional Redirect Malware Decoded – Eval base64_decode Example

I have this beautiful website and now there’s all this garbled code across all of my PHP files. What’s it do, and how did it get there?

This is a quick post to show you some encoded crud that can attack your site, and do some pretty bad stuff.

Encoded Payload – Eval( base64_decode)

Generally speaking, we see this type of payload dropped into PHP, HTML, and JavaScript files. They are typically dropped into an environment through a known vulnerability in outdated software. This isn’t the only entry point, but definitely the one we see the most.

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