Analyzing Proxy Based Spam Networks


We are no strangers to Blackhat SEO techniques, we’ve actually spent a great deal of time working and sharing various bits of information related to Blackhat SEO techniques over the years. What we haven’t shared, however, is the idea of Proxy-based Spam Networks (PSN). It’s not because it wasn’t interesting, it’s just not something we’d seen that often, or at all. As is often the case in the website security, techniques continue to evolve, they’re mastered and as such the space changes and it’s on us to understand, dissect and of course, deliver that information to each of you.

This naturally brings me to the latest trend we’re seeing, while difficult to quantify (you’ll soon see why) we have started to see and experience interesting configurations in which Blackhat SEO actors are employing the use of reverse proxies to:

  • Hijack and rank for your content.
  • Leverage that ranking for their own SEO needs (often with nefarious intentions).

Read More

Your Website Hacked but No Signs of Infection

Imagine for a moment, you have a suspicion that you have somehow had your website hacked. You see that something is off, but you feel as if you are missing something. This is the emotionally draining world that many live in, with a paranoia and concern that grips you once you see and recognize that something is not right. As humans we need closure, we need the ability to say… “Gotcha!” Often though, especially when it comes to hacks, we are left only with our imagination and that can be concerning for many.

In one of the many groups I participate in, I was reading an experience that spoke to this exact feeling. A user had noticed that a new administrator user had been added to their website, but barring a simple image file, they were unable to identify anything else out of place. To further complicate issues, the various security tools they were using kept reporting nothing was amiss. As a website owner, that’s perhaps the most frustrating feeling, when you can feel it in your bones something is wrong. Why aren’t the tools picking it up?
Read More

Website Security: How Do Websites Get Hacked?


In 2014 the total number of websites on the internet reached 1 billion, today it’s hovering somewhere in the neighborhood of 944 million due to websites going inactive and it is expected to normalize again at 1 billion sometime in 2015. Let’s take a minute to absorb that number for a moment. Another surprising statistic is that Google, one of the most popular search engines in the world, quarantines approximately 10,000 websites a day via its Safe Browsing technology. From our own research, of the millions of websites that push through our scanning technology, we often see 2 – 5% of the them have some Indicator of Compromise (IoC) that signifies a hack. Granted, this might be a bit high, as the websites being scanned are often suspected of having an issue, so to be conservative we would extrapolate that to suggest about 1% of the total websites online are hacked or infected. To put that into perspective, we are talking somewhere in the neighborhood of 9 million websites that are currently hacked or infected.

With this sort of impact, it’s only natural that people are curious how websites keep getting hacked. The challenge however, is that the answer has been the same for quite some time.
Read More

The Impacts of a Hacked Website

Today, with the proliferation of open-source technologies like WordPress, Joomla and other Content Management Systems (CMS) people around the world are able to quickly establish a virtual presence with little to no cost. In the process however, a lot is being lost in terms of what it means to own a website.

We are failing each other, we are not setting ourselves up for success. We are learning the hard way what large organizations already learned – being online is a responsibility and will eventually cost you something.

I recently shared a post talking to the motivations behind hacks. This post was important as it helped provide context and I encourage you to spend some time digesting the information. What it fails to do is what I want to focus on in this post.

What are the impacts of these hacks to your website? To your business?
Read More

Why Websites Get Hacked

I spend a good amount of time engaging with website owners across a broad spectrum of businesses. Interestingly enough, unless I’m talking large enterprise, there is a common question that often comes up:

Why would anyone ever hack my website?

Depending on who you are, the answer to this can vary. Nonetheless, it often revolves around a few very finite explanations.

Automation is Key

Understand that the attacks affecting a large number of website owners in the prosumer category (a term I’m using to describe website owners in micro, small, and medium-sized businesses leveraging platforms like WordPress, Joomla and others) are predominantly automated. I wrote an article on the subject back in 2012, it’s important to revisit the subject as it’s still very relevant today.

The benefits of these automated attacks have not changed, they still provide the attackers the following benefits:

Read More

SoakSoak Malware Compromises 100,000+ WordPress Websites

This Sunday has started with a bang. Google has blacklisted over 11,000 domains with this latest malware campaign from

Google Blacklisting -

Google Blacklisting –

Our analysis is showing impacts in the order of 100’s of thousands of WordPress specific websites. We cannot confirm the exact vector, but preliminary analysis is showing correlation with the Revslider vulnerability we reported a few months back.

Read More

Understanding the WordPress Security Plugin Ecosystem

This post is available in Spanish (Este post está disponible en español).

As a child, did you ever play that game where you sit in a circle and one person is responsible for whispering something into one persons ear, and that message gets relayed around the circle? Wasn’t it always funny to see what the final message received would be? Oh and how it would have morphed as it was processed and conveyed by each individual in the group.

This is what I see when I look at the WordPress Security Ecosystem.

The biggest challenge the ecosystem faces is product and service confusion. This is compounded by a variety of factors. I often categorize them, generally into two buckets – deliberate and non-deliberate confusion. For me deliberate product confusion comes often by marketeers and those looking to make a quick buck on what they perceive to be the next virtual gold rush. While non-deliberate confusion is introduced by those that mean well, or were once affected, and have come up with a genuine solution that likely addresses a very narrow issue.

An easy way to better appreciate this is to look at the WordPress Security Plugins specifically, as they’re tangible and that makes it easier to truly appreciate the nuances of the security space.

Contrary to popular belief, not all plugins are the same or created equal and you can’t compare them as that would not be an apples to apples comparison.

Interestingly enough, there are often pretty unique differentiating factors between each of the security plugins in the market, although in many cases there are one to one correlations. Human nature is also one of the contributing factors to confusion. As humans we are often configured to go the easiest route. We’re always looking for the one with the biggest audience, or the one that is pushed on us the most. If everyone else is using it, I should too. Rarely do we truly understand or give much thought to this phenomena.

Read More

My WordPress Website Was Hacked

Before you freak out, allow me to clarify. It was one of several honeypots we have running. The honeypots are spread across the most commonly employed hosting companies. From Virtual Private Servers (VPS) to shared environments, to managed environments. In most instances we pay and configure them like any other consumer would so that we aren’t given any special treatment.

Honey Pot Systems are decoy servers or systems set up to gather information regarding an attacker or intruder into your system… A Honey Pot system is set up to be easier prey for intruders than true production systems but with minor system modifications so that their activity can be logged or traced. The general thought is that once an intruder breaks into a system, they will come back for subsequent visits. During these subsequent visits, additional information can be gathered and additional attempts at file, security and system access on the Honey Pot can be monitored and saved. – SANS

Our goal is simple; we want to better understand the dynamic nature of website security and continue to analyze and interpret attackers’ intentions. Having live sites that we allow to get hacked also keeps us sharp in terms of how we respond to these intrusions and, if we’re being completely honest, helps us to better understand the emotions that a website owner, like yourself, might go through. Between you and I though, it really gets us excited.. almost as excited as a spider when they feel their web vibrating as their prey struggles to free itself… but I digress.

Sucuri - My Website was Hacked - Defacement

Sucuri – My Website was Hacked – Defacement

Read More

Backups – The Forgotten Website Security Pillar

Sucuri - Security Pillars

I travel a lot (might actually be an understatement these days), but the travel always revolves around a couple of common threads – namely website security education and awareness. In these travels, regardless of whether I’m speaking with a WordPress, Joomla, Drupal or another community, there are always common questions like, “How important is it to proactively protect my environment?” or, “How can I fix my environment after it’s been hacked?” Of course, those are really important questions, and as the CEO of a company that meets those needs, I’m more than happy to answer those big questions. But as I’ve traveled the country and answered those questions, I’ve noticed a fundamental lack of understanding of a more basic security need: backups, specifically how backups fit into the security spectrum.

It’s very easy to get bogged down in the minutiae that makes up your website’s security, but as with everything, having a great foundation will provide the security required when everything else fails.

Read More

Responsible Disclosure – Sucuri Open Letter to MailPoet and Future Disclosures

Many don’t know who I am. My name is Tony Perez, I’m the CEO of Sucuri. I have the pleasure of calling this company my family and everyday I work for every person at this company. My partner is Daniel Cid. He is one of the foremost thought leaders in the website security domain, his influence extending far beyond the communities that make up some of the most popular CMS applications today.

Together we are building one of the fastest growing website security companies in the domain, we have one simple mission, to create a safer web. We are a technology company built by technologists with a special, quirky, idea that we can make a difference.

Many don’t realize that the bedrock of our business is Research, all facets of research. It’s how we stay ahead of the bad guys, or attackers. It’s a responsibility we have, not just to the general public, but one that we owe to our clients – in basic terms, it’s what they pay us for. It’s how we ensure our tools and technologies stay ahead of the rest and what makes us the ideal solution for every website owner, our commitment to the website security domain.
Read More