Daniel B. Cid

About Daniel Cid

Daniel B. Cid is the Founder & CTO of Sucuri and also the founder of the open source OSSEC HIDS. His interests range from intrusion detection, log analysis (log-based intrusion detection), web-based malware research and secure development.

You can find more about Daniel at his site dcid.me or on Twitter: @danielcid

Anatomy of 2,000 Compromised Web Servers used in DDoS Attack

One of our clients was being attacked by a layer-7 DDoS attack for more than a week. The attack was generating around 5,000 HTTP requests per second, which took his site and server down. It also caused his hosting company to suspend his server for “ToS violation”. Yes, some hosting companies consider a ToS violation if you are suffering a DDoS. It is mostly an excuse to protect their networks, but very annoying for someone victim of an attack.

After a week of pain, he found our Website Firewall (WAF) product, the rest as they say is history. We were able to quickly block the attack and restore his site to normal operations. If that was all that there was to the story, then many would find this to be a very uninteresting story.

A Diamond in the Ruff

As is customary in our lab, we began analyzing the attack to see if there was anything else we could learn. That is when we noticed something curious, the IP addresses hitting the server were always constant.

We did some operating system identification (using p0f) and the attack was coming mostly from web servers running on Windows and Linux:

Sucuri - Web Server Compromise - Operating System Distribution

This is a bit unusual, most layer-7 DDoS attacks leverage compromised desktops and very few of them actually run on Linux. We also started checking the banners of these IPs and we saw a variety of web servers, but the majority of them were running Apache:

Sucuri - Web Server Compromise - Makeup Distribution

There were also a number of other IP addresses that were not displaying the server banner (or too slow to respond to our HTTP queries). This is the breakdown of the most used web servers on the IP addresses attacking our client:

Sucuri - Web Server Compromise - Web Servers

These were but a subset of the most active, in total we found close to 2,000 different IP addresses causing the damage (each one hitting the server a few times per second).

As far as location, most of them were coming from China, Taiwan and Thailand:

Sucuri - Layer 7 DDOS Attack  Source

Another interesting point is that more than 300 of them were using “AppServ Open Project” (version 2.5.9 or 2.5.10), which unfortunately bundles an old and outdated version of PHPMyAdmin.

Compromised Web Servers

From what we could gather, it seems someone created a bot net of compromised web servers that are running AppServ, outdated Apache, outdated IIS and other vulnerable software (e.g., PHPMyadmin).

This setup gives the attackers good power when attacking sites as they remain anonymous behind proxies. In this scenarios, they specifically focused on Layer 7 HTTP flood attacks, but it could have as easily been DNS application, an SSDP attack or any number of the available options when it comes to DDoS.

We will be contacting the network/hosts responsible for them to see if we can get them patched or shut down.


If your are a victim of a DDoS attack and need help, let us know, we’d love to help, you can start here.

Slider Revolution Plugin Critical Vulnerability Being Exploited

Mika Epstein, Ipstenu, of Dreamhost, notified us today of a serious vulnerability in the WordPress Slider Revolution Premium plugin which was patched silently.

It turns out that the vulnerability was disclosed via some underground forums. ThemePunch confirms that their plugin was patched in version 4.2 for those that purchase the plugin directly from them, and they include an auto-updater which would address the problem. The real issue lies in the way the plugin is wrapped into theme packages. ThemePunch’s approach to disclosing the issue was based on guidance they received. [updated 20140903]

This a very popular plugin, and appears to be one of the most downloaded slider plugins from Envato’s Marketplace – Code Canyon. It also appears to be bundled in theme packages so be sure to check your theme / plugins.

This is an example of where things go terribly wrong.


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New Brute Force Attacks Exploiting XMLRPC in WordPress

Brute force attacks against WordPress have always been very common. In fact, Brute Force attacks against any CMS these days is a common occurrence, what is always interesting however are the tools employed to make it happen.

You create a website, because it’s super easy these days, publish the content and within a few weeks people try to repeatedly log in. These login attempts come from botnets, they are automated and their goal is simple “break into as many websites as they can by guessing their passwords.” Once they find one that matches, they take over of the site and use it to distribute malware, spam and similar activities.

Here is a small example, from our own honeypots, where we see hundreds of login attempts per day, trying various combinations:

user: admin, pass: admin
user: admin, pass: 123456
user: admin, pass: 123123
user: admin, pass 112233
user: admin, pass: pass123
..

The passwords may seem silly, but after going through the most common 200/300 dictionary passwords, they can get into many web sites.

XMLRPC wp.getUsersBlogs

Originally, these brute force attacks always happened via /wp-login.php attempts, lately however they are evolving and now leveraging the XMLRPC wp.getUsersBlogs method to guess as many passwords as they can. Using XMLRPC is faster and harder to be detected, explaining this change in tactics. This is not to be confused with our post back in March where we reported XMLRPC being used to DDOS websites, oh no, in this instance they are leveraging it to break into websites. Be sure to read up on the differences between Brute Force and Denial of Service attacks.

This attack is being made possible because many calls in the WordPress XMLRPC implementation required a username and password. It these attacks, we are seeing wp.getUsersBlogs being used (and very few times wp.getComments), but it could be other calls as well. If you provide a user and a password to them, it will reply back if the combination is correct or not:

<methodCall><methodName>wp.getUsersBlogs</methodName><params><param><value>
 <string>admin</string></value></param>
  <param><value><string>112233</string></value></param></params>
</methodCall>

In the example above, the attackers tried the user admin with the password 112233.

Large Scale brute force

To examine the scale of this attack, we went back through our logs to get a better sense for the scale of the attacks. The past couple of weeks have been interesting, the attacks have increased ten-fold with almost 2 million attempts since the beginning of July coming from 17,000 different source attacking IPs. Some days we were seeing almost 200k attempts.

wordpress-brute-force

The only reason these numbers are not higher is because we’re killing the logs after block attempts, so all you are seeing is the gradual increase in attacks, but not the complete picture. This is what makes this entire thing very scary for website owners.

Another interesting point about this attack is the user names being tried. Instead of relying only on “admin”, it tries to find the domain name and the real admin of the site and use it instead. These are the top user names tried:

 179005 test
 167147 admin
  32030 sitedomain (domain modified to protect the innocent)
  15850 sitedomain2 (domain modified to protect the innocent)
   9590 realsiteadmin (user name modified to protect the innocent)
   9564 realsiteadmin2 (user name modified ..)

So out of 2 million attempts, only 167k used the user name admin. That shows that just disabling the admin user name, does not help if the attackers can easily find out the real user. One small reason we no longer subscribe to the argument of removing the “Admin” user to be secure.

As for the passwords, they are using the most common passwords found in many dictionaries:

   1dc13d
   admin
   123123
   admin1
   admins
   123456
   12345678
   7777777
   letmein
   121212
   qweqwe
   iloveyou
   administrator
   holysh!t
   55555
   1q2w3e
   qwerty
   wordpress
   wpsite
   internet
   asdfghjkl
   121314
   lollipop
   killer
   pass
   lovers
   hello
   dragon
   admin123
   office
   jerome
   fyfcnfcbz
Brute Force Protection

There are many ways to block brute force attacks. If you have a dedicated server, you can install OSSEC (open source) on it and let it automatically block the IP addresses that miss too many passwords. We automatically include brute force (password guessing) protection on our Website Firewall (CloudProxy), so if you are looking for a 1-click solution, you can leverage it.

There are obviously a number of application level tools (i.e., plugins) many will recommend within the WordPress ecosystem to help with Brute Force attacks. Here is the thing, none of the ones we tried will protect you from the XMLRPC calls, including our own plugin. It’s likely why we’re seeing the shift in attack methods. Blocking at the edge is going to be your preferred method until that gets fixed.

MailPoet Vulnerability Exploited in the Wild – Breaking Thousands of WordPress Sites

A few weeks ago we found and disclosed a serious vulnerability on the MailPoet WordPress Plugin. We urged everyone to upgrade their sites immediately due to the severity of the issue. The vulnerability allowed an attacker to inject anything they wanted on the site, which could be used for malware injections, defacement, spam and many more nefarious acts.

This is not something we’re excited to report, but we were right.

A few days ago we started to see a massive number of WordPress sites compromised with malware. The malware code had some bugs, it was breaking many websites, overwriting good files and appending various statements in loops at the end of files.

At the time of the post, the root cause of the malware injections was a bit of a mystery. After a frantic 72 hours, we are confirming that the attack vector for these compromises is the MailPoet vulnerability. To be clear, the MailPoet vulnerability is the entry point, it doesn’t mean your website has to have it enabled or that you have it on the website; if it resides on the server, in a neighboring website, it can still affect your website.

All the hacked sites were either using MailPoet or had it installed on another sites within the same shared account (cross-contamination still matters).

Exploited in the Wild

The attacks always start the same, with the attackers trying to upload a custom (and malicious) theme to the site:

194.79.195.139 - - [05/Jul/2014:01:41:30 -0700] "POST /wp-admin/admin-post.php?page=wysija_campaigns&action=themes HTTP/1.0" 302 - "http://site.com.com/wp-admin/admin.php?page=wysija_campaigns&id=1&action=editTemplate" "Mozilla/5.0"

Once they succeed, they upload the malicious theme, they access their backdoor inside /wp-content/uploads/wysija/themes/mailp/:

194.79.195.139 - - [05/Jul/2014:01:41:31 -0700] "GET /wp-content/uploads/wysija/themes/mailp/index.php HTTP/1.1" 200 12 "Mozilla/5.0"
194.79.195.139 - - [05/Jul/2014:04:08:16 -0700] "GET /wp-content/uploads/wysija/themes/mailp/index.php?cookie=1 HTTP/1.0" 200 12 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows)"

They get full control of the site.

The Backdoor is very nasty and creates an admin user called 1001001. It also injects a backdoor code to all theme/core files. The biggest issue with this injection is that it often overwrites good files, making very hard to recover without a good backup in place.

So if you see this error on a site:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected ')' in /home/user/public_html/site/wp-config.php on line 91

It means it was likely hacked through this vulnerability.

Mass Infections

MailPoet is a very popular plugin with almost 2 million downloads, so as you can expect, when such severe vulnerability is identified, it can be mass exploited.

This is the total number of hacked sites that we were able to identify so far (per day):

Sucuri-MailPoet-Infections

This is based on sites scanned on our free sitecheck scanner. The number of hacked sites is likely much bigger.

Upgrade Mailpoet!

If you are running MailPoet, we recommend upgrading it asap to the latest version. Users of our Website Firewall (CloudProxy) have been protected against this threat since day 0. However, if you do not have a firewall (WAF) on your website, you have to upgrade the plugin or remove it altogether to avoid more issues.

SQL Injection Vulnerability – vBulletin 5.x

The vBulletin team just released a security patch for vBulletin 5.0.4, 5.0.5, 5.1.0, 5.1.1, and 5.1.2 to address a SQL injection vulnerability on the member list page. Every vBulletin user needs to upgrade to the latest version asap.

vBulletin is a very popular forum sofware used on more than 100,000 web sites.

Directly from vBulletin.com:

A security issue has been reported to us that affects the versions of vBulletin listed here: 5.0.4, 5.0.5, 5.1.0, 5.1.1, and 5.1.2 We have released security patches to account for this vulnerability. The issue may allow attackers to perform SQL injection attacks on your database. It is recommended that all users update as soon as possible.

You can download the patch for your version here: http://members.vbulletin.com/patches.php

This vulnerability was discovered by the Romanian Security Team (RST), so it could already be used in the wild on 0-day attacks. If you can’t patch vBulletin, we recommend blocking access to the memberlist page in the mean time.

If you are leveraging the Sucuri Website Firewall product, your website is already protected through our virtual patching signatures.

Website Malware – Mobile Redirect to BaDoink Porn App

A few weeks ago we reported that we were seeing a huge increase in the number of web sites compromised with a hidden redirection to pornographic content. It was a very tricky injection, with the redirection happening only once per day per IP address and only if the visitor was using a mobile device (IPhone, Android and a few others).

These types of injections are called conditional redirections because certain conditions need to be met for them to redirect visitors. They are not always present and the malware authors try very hard to hide them from the website owner. The malware code looks for logged in cookies to try to identify whether or not someone is managing the site and then attempts to never redirect someone who is logged in. Finally, if a visitor gets redirected once, the malware will not redirect them again. The goal for the malware author is for visitors to not report something going wrong with a website. In this example, if you were to visit an infected site, you’d be redirected, but from your point of view, maybe it was just something weird so you retype the url and now you aren’t redirected. Since everything is working normally now, you decide not to report it and the malware lives on.

As you can imagine, this sort of malware can be difficult to troubleshoot. In fact, very often webmasters think it’s a typo and move on instead of investigating what happened. For that reason, most sites remain compromised, so if anyone ever complains that your site redirecting to “instabang.com” or a Badoink Porn App, it is very likely your site is hacked.


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Ask Sucuri: Who is logging into my WordPress site?

Today, we’re going to revisit our Q&A series. If you have any questions about malware, blacklisting, or security in general, send them to us at: info@sucuri.net. For all the “Ask Sucuri” answers, go here.


Question: How do I know who is logging into my WordPress site?

Answer: One of the most basic and important security aspects of any system is access control, specifically logging your access control point. It defines who can do what and where and under what circumstances. However, access control without the proper enforcement and auditing is like a law that is not enforced by the police; it loses its meaning.

WordPress has a very powerful access control tool, known as roles and capabilities, that allows you to specify what each user can do. However, it lacks good auditing capabilities. The purpose of auditing, i.e. logging, is to give administrators visibility into what is happening on the website at any given time.

Auditing is a very broad term. We could go in depth into the various elements that you, as an administrator, should audit. However, for this post we’re going to focus on your access control, specifically who is logging in.

Sucuri WordPress Security Plugin – Last Logins Feature

Out-of-the-box, the WordPress CMS does not provide auditing, nor does it include any type of authentication auditing for successful logins. For this reason, we have added both capabilities to our Free WordPress Security plugin.

The plugin allows administrators to see who is and has logged into your website. It includes attributes like location (i.e. where) and time. It’s known as the Last Logins feature (it’s based off the Linux “last” command).

This is what it looks like in your dashboard:

wordpress-lastlogins

It will list the users, IP addresses (hidden in the image) and the time of the login.

If you want to know who is logging in to your site (from when and from where), then leverage our Free WordPress Security plugin.

Note that it will only start logging the users, after you install it. So as soon you add the plugin, the last-logins table will be empty. But if you try to logout/log back in to WordPress, you should start to see it populating.

Importance of Auditing Your Access Control

For website administrators, we cannot stress the importance of logging activity, such as user log ins, enough. We handle various incidents on a daily basis where the website owner has no idea as to who is and isn’t logging into their environment.

Often, after a compromise, the forensics team will work with the website owner to understand what was going on. In many instances, basic auditing would have informed the client that something was not right. Here are some examples:

  1. Website owner works on the Pacific Coast, yet his user is logging in from China with his username and password
  2. Website owner is sleeping, yet somehow, the client’s user is still logging in
  3. A new user is logging into the environment every day and the website owner never created the user or it’s a single user website

Are you able to say, confidently, that this is not happening to you? If the answer is, “Yes,” then congratulations, you’re adhering to the auditing basics. If the answer is, “No,” then you should seriously consider downloading our free plugin.

Remote File Upload Vulnerability in WordPress MailPoet Plugin (wysija-newsletters)

Marc-Alexandre Montpas, from our research team, found a serious security vulnerability in the MailPoet WordPress plugin. This bug allows an attacker to upload any file remotely to the vulnerable website (i.e., no authentication is required).

This is a serious vulnerability, The MailPoet plugin (wysija-newsletters) is a very popular WordPress plugin (over 1,700,000 downloads). This vulnerability has been patched, if you run the WordPress MailPoet plugin please upgrade ASAP!

Are you affected?

If you have this plugin activated on your website, the odds are not in your favor. An attacker can exploit this vulnerability without having any privileges/accounts on the target site. This is a major threat, it means every single website using it is vulnerable.

The only safe version is the 2.6.7, this was just released a few hours ago (2014-Jul-01).

Why is it so dangerous?

This bug should be taken seriously, it gives a potential intruder the power to do anything he wants on his victim’s website. It allows for any PHP file to be uploaded. This can allow an attacker to use your website for phishing lures, sending SPAM, host malware, infect other customers (on a shared server), and so on!!

Technical Details

Our research team discovered this flaw a few weeks ago and immediately disclosed it to the MailPoet team. They responded very well and released a patch as quickly as possible.

Because of the nature of the vulnerability, specifically it’s severity, we will not be disclosing additional technical details. The basics of the vulnerability however is something all plugin developers should be mindful of: the vulnerability resides in the fact that the developers assumed that WordPress’s “admin_init” hooks were only called when an administrator user visited a page inside /wp-admin/.

It is a easy mistake to make and they used that hook (admin_init) to verify if a specific user was allowed to upload files.

However, any call to /wp-admin/admin-post.php also executes this hook without requiring the user to be authenticated. Thus making their theme upload functionality available to everybody.

Pro-tip: If you are a developer, never use admin_init() (or is_admin()) as an authentication method.

How should you protect yourself?

Again, Update the plugin as soon as possible. Keeping WordPress and all plugins updated is the first step to keep your sites secured.

For our customers: The good news is that any website behind our Website Firewall – CloudProxy has been protected against this vulnerability since we found it.

TimThumb WebShot Code Execution Exploit (0-day)

If you are still using Timthumb after the serious vulnerability that was found on it last year, you have one more reason to be concerned.

A new 0-day was just disclosed on TimThumb’s “Webshot” feature that allows for certain commands to be executed on the vulnerable website remotely (no authentication required). With a simple command, an attacker can create, remove and modify any files on your server. For example:

http://vulnerablesite.com/wp-content/plugins/pluginX/timthumb.php?webshot=1&src=http://vulnerablesite.com/$(rm$IFS/tmp/a.txt)

http://vulnerablesite.com/wp-content/plugins/pluginX/timthumb.php??webshot=1&src=http://vulnerablesite.com/$(touch$IFS/tmp/a.txt)

In the first example, we were able to remove a file (rm command) and on the second example, create one (using the touch command). And you are not limited to only these 2 commands as many others can be executed remotely (RCE). The full disclosure is available here for anyone interested in more technical details.

Are you vulnerable?

The good news is that Timthumb comes with the webshot option disabled by default, so just a few Timthumb installations are vulnerable. However, you have to check if your timthumb file does not have this option enabled to prevent it from being misused. Open your timthumb file (inside your theme or plugin) and search for “WEBSHOT_ENABLED” and make sure it is set to “false”, just like this one:

define (‘WEBSHOT_ENABLED’, false);

If it is enabled, you have to disable it asap. Our research team is monitoring this vulnerability very closely and if we have any news, we will update in this post.

For our customers: Another piece of good news is that any website behind our website firewall is already protected automatically against this vulnerability.

SPAM Hack Targets WordPress Core Install Directories

Do you run your website on WordPress? Have you checked the integrity of your core install lately for SPAM like “Google Pharmacy” stores or other fake stores?

We have been tracking and analyzing a growing trend in SEO Spam (a.k.a., Search Engine Poisoning (SEP)) attacks in which thousands of compromised WordPress websites are being used to hide fake stores and spam doorways. In every case, the attacker is leveraging one of the core install directories – wp-includes.

google-pharma

Abusing WP-INCLUDES with SPAM

By default, every WordPress installation comes with 3 main directories: /wp-content, /wp-admin and /wp-includes. Generally, /wp-includes is reserved for generic code and is the heart of WordPress where all major core files are stored. It’s a folder that doesn’t need to be remotely accessed and should not contain any externally accessible or executable HTML or PHP files.

Unfortunately, that is not what we’re seeing. Thousands of WordPress sites seem to have been hacked, and in each case SPAM has been injected into their core directory wp-includes. We have found it’s not specific to Pharmaceuticals either, it includes things like “Payday spam” and “cheap bags”, “cheap watches” and many other forms of SPAM content.

This type of spam injection has 3 main characteristics:

  1. The SPAM pages are hidden inside a random directory inside wp-includes (eg: /wp-includes/finance/paydayloan or /wp-includes/werty/)
  2. The spam is conditional and often based on the referrer
  3. We’ve noticed that, in almost every instance, the websites are running outdated WordPress installs or cPanel – this is obviously conjecture

Here is a small list of 100 WordPress hacked websites with SPAM injected in their wp-includes directories. All of them are publicly accessible by doing some Google searches:

http://www.immunomix.com/ITIpress/wp-includes/finance/paydayloan/payday-loans-instant.html
http://microwaveamps.co.uk/wp-includes/js/thickbox/lib/loans/payday-loans-in-london-uk.html
http://www.scifidimensions.com/wp-includes/finance/cashadvance/cash-advance-loan-lenders.html
http://www.beereading.com/wp-includes/finance/cashadvance/cash-advance-loans.html
http://vastema.com/wp-includes/cheap-hermes-lindy-bags-on-sale.html
http://www.antibabypillerezeptfrei.net/wp-includes/js/crop/advancement/helpers/blrmalaysiabank.html
http://todayscliche.com/wp-includes/palco.html
http://www.ethosindia.com/wp-includes/mambo.php?p=55
http://www.turnerforte.com/blog/wp-includes/finance/cashadvance/cash-advance-credit.html
http://www.ednapletonblog.com/wp-includes/werty/replica-36596.html
http://www.pettycustomhomes.com/wp-includes/cheap-kids-nba-jerseys-3167596.html
http://www.pondproshop.com/reference/wp-includes/catalog/services/vybe/vybe-band-reviews.html
http://firefly-path.net/wp-includes/pomo/qwe/4/Buy-Balenciaga-High-Quality-Replica-Clutches.php
http://wolfgangcapellari.com/wp-includes/pomo/rolex-imitation.html
http://byphandyman.com.au/wp-includes/people/replica-bvlgari-fake-watches.html
http://rumbaytimbal.com/wp-includes/reviews/
http://www.preservinggoodstock.com/wp-includes/louis-vuitton-bags-5641302.html
http://www.domagojkovacic.com/wp-includes/wholesale-jerseys-from-china-7479567.html
http://maciejkot.pl/wp-includes/detect.html
http://allinseopack.com/wp-includes/js/plupload/oscar-leeser-bio-i12.com
http://www.marinavendrell.com/wp-includes/store/diet/solpria/solpria-cleanse-reviews.html
http://missouriche.org/wp-includes/louisvuitton19.html
http://vastema.com/wp-includes/replica-hermes-birkin-25-cm.html
http://www.conemund.org/eng/wp-includes/replica.php
http://cri-technologies.com/wp-includes/pomo/mkheaf.php?psdjvwei=uplink%20dwd
http://www.giser.net/wp-includes/headt.php
http://chicksdigme.com/wp-includes-old/vanilla-sky-lyrics-owl-city-i0.com
http://jewelrypictures.org/wp-includes/js/imgareaselect/ghd-machine-i5.com
http://www.jobshopsf.com/wp/wp-includes/finance/autoloan/car-loan.html
http://www.ebrice.com/wp-includes/shop/health/tagaway/buy-tag-away-discount-price.html
http://amr-nadim.net/wp-includes/fake-hermes-clic-clac-bracelet–5621.html
http://jesicaglot.com.ar/wp-includes/news/replica-watches_14626.html
http://funaki.ens-serve.net/wp-includes/images/news/black-evening-dresses.html
http://linkarbeid.no/wp-includes/replica-celine-tas.html
http://www.iwillstandupforyou.com/wp-includes/nfljerseys-19244-6847676.html
http://www.viparenda.com.ua/wp-includes/pomo/index/shorewatches.htm
http://www.lelieuunique.com/site/wp-includes/wp-about.php?p=124-chaussure-christian-louboutin-pas-cher.html
http://redtouch.com.mt/wp-includes/news/oris-aquis-depth-gauge-replica-watch-hands-on.html
http://www.stridesforstars.com/wp-includes/rewrite/list.html
http://perfectgroup.se/wp-includes/replica/rolex
http://www.cowalrugby.co.uk/wp-includes.php
http://janmccraylaw.com/wp-includes/watches/replica-32802.html
http://bekarty.pl/wp-includes/be/cartier-swiss-replica.html
http://conceitorio.com.br/home/wp-includes/indo/rolex-airking.html
http://www.liftstudios.ca/wp-includes/images/arrows/lib/chanel/wallets/Chanel-Wallet-On-a-Chain-Replica.php
http://mag.amazing-kids.org/wp-includes/js/crop/lib/vuitton/LV-Bags/Louis-Vuitton-Overnight-Bags-Replica.php
http://atelier.aencre.org/wp-includes/js/thickbox/lib/louboutin/model/christian-louboutin-crystal-daffodil-pumps-replica.php
http://feo.nusta.com.ua/wp-includes/images/news/buswatches.htm
http://cafetaxa.dk/wp-includes/replica-watches-uk/
http://www.socialned.nl/wp-includes/php/tag/michael-kors-outlet-washington
http://podcasttennis.free.fr/wordpress/wp-includes/js/tinymce/themes/advanced/ejezuli/inig/
http://www.baypointmarina.com/wp-includes/brand/ralph-lauren-sleepwear.html
http://nsldigest.org/wp-includes/css/wp-pointer/Buy-Good-Replica-Louis-Vuitton-Shoes_25510.html
http://supportambitiongroup.com/wp-includes/css/download-free-porn-no-sign-up.php
http://icmcc.org/wp-includes/js/jcrop/gearshifter.php?dqq=506
http://w3f.pl/wp-includes/pomo/silagra-50-price.html
http://www.fedusa.org.za/wp-includes/js/tinymce/wp-mce-help.php
http://www.styleslicker.com/wp-includes/js/buytadalafil/index.php?page=4
http://nclarkplaning.co.uk/blog/wp-includes/Cardiovascular/ventolin-mdi-buy.html
http://www.cadillacpizzapub.com/livemusic/wp-includes/finance/creditscore/annual-credit-score.html
http://www.nagaloka.org/wp-includes/filesd/1137a750e374cebd95e7bfb4c05c60a0
http://www.immunomix.com/ITIpress/wp-includes/finance/creditreport/credit-report-and-score.html
http://www.elpaisdealtamira.es/wp-includes/js/crop/lib/vuitton/LV-Replica/Louis-Vuitton-Replica-AAA.php
http://yogagals.com/wp-includes/bottega-veneta.html
http://www.baypointmarina.com/wp-includes/brand/ralph-lauren-bicester-village.html
http://nrca-railroad.com/wp-includes/js/crop/_notes/vuitton/LV-Outlets/Louis-Vuitton-Outlet-Store-in-Kansas-City-Missouri-MO.php
http://www.madeleineking.co.uk/wp-includes/the-wine-house-lichfield-i10.com
http://www.mecalfab.com/mecalfab1/wp-includes/discountstore/kitchen/ninjamegablender/mega-ninja-blender.html
http://oisa.org/trl/wp-includes/onlineshop/naturalproducts/powerprecision/buy-power-precision-lean-muscle-formula.html
http://www.elpaisdealtamira.es/wp-includes/js/crop/lib/vuitton/LV-Replica/Louis-Vuitton-Replica-AAA.php
http://adamriemer.me/wp-includes/user/index.php?p=netflix-rentals-netflix-dvd-movie
http://adcaustintech.com/javaegl/wp-includes/user/index.php?p=netflix-shares
http://todomejora.org/wp-includes/js/crop/lib/loans/payday-loans-without-checking-account-requirements.html
http://www.thekookmovie.com/wp-includes/php
http://www.moorefinefoods.com/wp-includes/heads7.html
http://www.businsure.com.au/wp-includes/jordanretroretails.com.html
http://www.airjordanpaschererfr.com/
http://stoleti.cz/wp-includes/images/index.php
http://www.chriswind.net/wp-includes/nets1121.html
http://icmcc.org/wp-includes/js/jcrop/gearshifter.php?dqq=196
http://www.demalagana.es/wp-includes/jordan11spacejambox.com.html
http://www.iarld.com/wp-includes/sageron.html
http://www.maintenantlagauche.com/wp-includes/class-wp-login.php
http://www.thesinbin.ca/wp-includes/images/jordansbred-us.com.html
http://www.plantingdandelions.com/wp-includes/x-jordan.html
http://www.martaortells.com/wordpress/wp-includes/images/jordansinfrared.com.html
http://missouriche.org/wp-includes/nikefree11.html
http://www.accqtrak.com/WordPress/wp-includes/Text/Diff/Renderer/Year57.php
http://urbancampout.com/wp-includes/glass.php
http://kortshoes.nl/wp-includes/The/fake-replica-watches.html
http://wolfgangcapellari.com/wp-includes/pomo/rolex-imitation.html
http://vastema.com/wp-includes/buy-hermes-lindy-handbags-outlet.html
http://maciejkot.pl/wp-includes/detect.html
http://nrca-railroad.com/wp-includes/js/crop/_notes/vuitton/LV-Buy/Buy-Louis-Vuitton-in-Warsaw-Poland.php
http://www.elpaisdealtamira.es/wp-includes/js/crop/lib/vuitton/LV-Cheap/Cheap-Louis-Vuitton-Luggage-Knock-Off.php
http://dibach.com/wp-includes/Text/Lifestyle/dating-lord-elgin-watches.php
http://www.iwillstandupforyou.com/wp-includes/real-gucci-belt-for-men-cheap-8163353.html
http://www.missouriche.org/wp-includes/index.html
http://www.lonestarlandscaping.biz/wp-includes/store/diet/greencoffee/where-can-i-buy-green-coffee-bean.html
http://www.andersonmontana.com/test/wp-includes/Text/Diff/Renderer/Filter17.php
http://www.cerbone.com/wp-includes/store/exercise/contourabs/contour-abs-reviews.html
http://www.smkgear.com/_wp/wp-includes/discountstore/home/solaramerica/solar-america-home-power-station.html

This is a very small sample. A quick search on Google using inurl:/wp-includes viagra levitra cialis reveals more than 13,000 pages. As you rotate out the SPAM keywords that number increases dramatically. You quickly start painting a pretty dire picture as you run more scans:

WordPress Wp-includes SPAM

If you find yourself with similar symptoms, we recommend replacing your core install or seeking professional help.

If you are a Do it Yourself’er (DIY’er) then be sure to manually replace the core installs. Don’t just select update in your administrator panel because doing so won’t remove the file and while it may address the issue on the surface, it won’t be getting to the bottom of the issue.

Conditional Redirections

The term Conditional should not be new to most of our readers, but if you’re new we recommend diving into our older posts to better understand how it works. A good place to start is our most recent post on redirects that were occurring only on mobile devices and targeting Porn websites.

If you click on any of these URL’s, you will see doorways for different types of spam. Some are just like the Google Pharmacy screenshot and some with real complex fake stores. However, if you are coming from a Google search, referrer = google.com, they will redirect you to the final SPAM destination.

And what is the final spam destination? These are the ones we have been able to isolate to date:


http://www.greboxs.com/


http://www.mkbagsesale.com/


http://www.shoebuy.com


http://www.top-online-pills.com/

We don’t know if they are really malicious or being used by affiliate spam, but they appear to be the final destination for all these spam pages.

How are these WordPress sites getting hacked?

While we don’t have definitive proof as we do not have control of these environments, each instance we have analyzed always show one common denominator – out of date software. We cannot stress the importance of patching your software via upgrades and if you can’t, be sure to leverage tools that allow you to operate safely on the web with your out of date software. The last thing any website owner wants is to find out later that their brand and system resources have been used for nefarious acts.